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Strategies for a discontinuous future.












Monday, June 21, 2004
 


Art of the Day

Check out what Pleix have been up to lately.

-- umair // 1:10 PM //


 


The Ludologist is an interesting read.

-- umair // 1:08 PM //


 


MattoBotto - the convergence of IM and blogs. Very nice - this is a model that has much potential, for producers, consumers, and sponsors alike.

-- umair // 1:08 PM //


 


Brian Eno on long-term thinking. Hmmm. This is a nice example of why geeks should study more econ and psych. Those sciences tell us that short-term thinking and irrational risk preferences are almost pathologically wired into our decision-making. Without acknowledging those, thinking about the 'long now' is going to be forever confined to, well, geeks.

-- umair // 12:32 PM //


 


Site-flavored Google search, aka, Google's take on personalized search.

-- umair // 12:18 PM //


 


Geek of the Day

History of statistics page.

-- umair // 12:17 PM //


 


N-Gage 2.0. Blah, blah, blah.

-- umair // 12:16 PM //


 


Cybaea is kind of interesting.

-- umair // 12:15 PM //


 


Nice article about the death of Viacom and the end of traditional media industries. Ironic that it's written by one of the TheStreet guys - still more ironic that they've finally woken up to the fact that this industry doesn't need (rights) protection, it needs revolution. We get fresh examples of this every day.

On another note, Cory's speech about DRM that's flying around the Net is nice, but seriously old hat - the question now is, what happens next? I've heard endless arguments by analogy to previous technological shifts for media (ie phonograph, etc, etc). I think these are no valid arguments.

Here's why: None of these previous innovations actually altered the fundamental economics of media; they simply changed the size of the structures involved (ie, printing presses and phonographs lower entry barriers to consumption of their various media). So media industries haven't needed to change in a very long time. And they've ended up in a very nasty place - one where hypercompetition and strategic myopia have created massive zero-sum winner-take-all dynamics fueled by marketing and licensing wars.

But the Net does fundamentally alter the economics of media - it actually vaporizes the old media economics, and creates entirely new structures and mechanisms, like distributed economies of scale, massively multilateral contracts, replication chains, so...but my ideas are fairly well known by now - let's see if they pan out.

-- umair // 12:11 PM //


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